Keywords : Diabetes


Some anti-diabetic properties of Prosopis farcta extracts in alloxan induced diabetic in adult rats

Ismael H. Mohammed; Ismail S. Kakey; Mahdi M. Farimani

Iraqi Journal of Veterinary Sciences, 2020, Volume 34, Issue 1, Pages 109-113
DOI: 10.33899/ijvs.2019.125557.1076

Prosopis farctais belonged to Mimosaceae family, commonly known as mesquite. It was chosen to investigate their effect on α-glucosidase inhibitory activity (in-vitro), serum glucose and liver functions. Roots, fruits, and leaves of P. farcta, were extracted by n-hexane, ethyl acetate, and methanol. α-glucosidase inhibition was analyzed by using ELISA technique then half maximal inhibitory concentration IC50 was found. The blood glucose levels were determined with a glucose analyzer model. The serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP), Alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and serum total bilirubin (TB) were estimated by using the Cobas diagnostic kit with a fully automated chemical analyzer. Diabetes was done by a single dose of 120 mg alloxan/kg b.w with subcutaneously injection. Ethyl acetate extracts of P. farcta showed the higher α-glucosidase inhibitory activity, and the best one was root extract. Treatments of the alloxan-induced diabetes rats were done by daily oral administration of different concentrations with P. farcta extracts of ethyl acetate for 28 days and the dose 200 mg/kg BW was the effective one. The root extract was the best one for reduction of serum glucose followed by leaves then fruits. Administration of root extract of P. farcta showed a decrease in the levels of ALP and TB in alloxan-induced diabetes rats. The fruit extract of P. farcta showed decreasing in the level of ALP in alloxan-induced diabetes rats. In conclusion, the P. farcta extracts for ethyl acetate have properties of hypoglycemic effect as well as improving some parameters related with diabetic complications of liver functions.

Prophylactic role of sweet almond (Prunus amygdalus) suspension in healthy and experimentally induced diabetic rats

Lubna Ahmed Kafi; Farah R. Kbyeh

Iraqi Journal of Veterinary Sciences, 2020, Volume 34, Issue 1, Pages 59-64
DOI: 10.33899/ijvs.2020.164357

The current study aimed to determine some positive prophylactic effects of sweet almond suspension (SAS) on blood glucose and lipid profile of experimentally aloxan induced hyperglycemic male rats. Thirty male adult rats divided randomly into two equal groups, prevention group treated with sweet almond suspension for 60 days at two doses 1.42 or 2.84 g/kg of body weight (PD1 and PD2), and then hyperglycemia was induced by using single dose injection of alloxan (150 mg/kg of body weight). There was significant increase in means values of glucose and the concentrations of total cholesterol (TC), Triglyceride (TG), low density lipoproteins cholesterol (LDL-C), very low density lipoproteins cholesterol (VLDL-C), and low rate concentration of cholesterol in high density lipoproteins (HDL-C) after five days of injection compared with pretreatment values and after 60 days of treatment with SAS values. In conclusion there was protective effect of sweet almond suspension on hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia in two experimentally groups, especially 2.84mg/Kg BW.  

Trypanocidal efficacy of diminazene in diabetic rats

U. S. Chigozie; A. B. Maduka; J. G. Ifeanyi

Iraqi Journal of Veterinary Sciences, 2012, Volume 26, Issue 1, Pages 33-38
DOI: 10.33899/ijvs.2012.46950

The experiment was conducted to investigate the impact of hyperglycaemia on the trypanocidal efficacy of diminazene aceturate. Groups of alloxan-induced diabetic rats infected with T. brucei and T. congolense were treated with diminazene aceturate, and trypanocidal effects compared with normal non-diabetic controls. Results showed that the prepatent period was shorter in the diabetic (11.25±1.65 days) than non-diabetic-T. congolense (15.0±1.73 days), and also variations in responses to the trypanocidal therapy between the diabetic and non-diabetic groups were detected. Parasite clearance time did not differ significantly between the diabetic and non-diabetic (43.2±8.89 versus 52.8±8.89 hours in T. brucei and 33.6±5.9 versus 36.0±6.93 hours in T. congolense, respectively). The relapse intervals were shorter in the diabetic than non-diabetic (16 days versus 23 days in T. brucei, and 7 days versus 14 days in T. congolense, respectively). Proportion of relapses was greater in the diabetic- (100%) than non-diabetic-T. congolense (66.7%). We also find parasite species-related differences in susceptibility to the trypanocide, with a higher apparent cure rate in the T. brucei than T. congolense group. We conclude from the results of this study that the chemotherapeutic effectiveness of diminazene aceturate may be diminished in patients with diabetes mellitus. Further study is needed to validate this hypothesis.