Keywords : Chicks


Study the analgesic effect of diclofenac and silymarin coadministration in chicks

Yasser M. Albadrany; Ahmed S. Naser; Mohammad M. Hasan

Iraqi Journal of Veterinary Sciences, In Press
DOI: 10.33899/ijvs.2021.127065.1453

The study aimed to investigate the analgesic as well as anti-inflammatory effects of diclofenac and silymarin in chicks. The up and down procedure was used to assess the effective median analgesic dosages (ED50s) of diclofenac and silymarin administered intraperitoneally either alone or at the same time in chicks. Also, Analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects were measured by using the formalin test. Isobolographically, ED50s of drugs were assessed for the manner of interaction between both. Formalin testing also supervised analgesic and anti-inflammatory coadministration impact of diclofenac and silymarin at doses 5 and 40 mg/kg and 2.5 and 20 mg/kg respectively. Analgesic ED50s for diclofenac and silymarin in chicks were 9.3 and 76.6 mg/kg separately. Concomitant administration of drugs at a fixed ratio 0.5:0.5 and 0.25:0.25 of their individual ED50 values reduced their ED50s to 2.3:18.6 mg/kg and 2.2:16.5 mg/kg separately. ED50s isobolographic analysis showed synergistic analgesic effects of both drugs. Additionally, coadministration of both drugs had effective analgesic and anti-inflammatory effect, as seen by formalin test, led to a significant rise in latency to lift right foot beside a significant decline in foot lifting frequency when compared with control value, the anti-inflammatory reaction was demonstrated by a significant decrease in foot thickness compared to control value. In conclusion, the data indicate that diclofenac and silymarin coadministration controls acute pain synergistically, and suppress inflammatory reaction.

Acute toxicity of metronidazole and its interaction with chlorpyrifos in chicks

Douaa H. Alsanjary; Sawsan M. Amin

Iraqi Journal of Veterinary Sciences, In Press
DOI: 10.33899/ijvs.2021.127035.1442

Metronidazole is antimicrobial drug for human and animal use, The more characteristic side effect associated with use high dose of metronidazole is neurotoxic signs, some of these signs that recorded in animal represented by ataxia and tremor, there is limited information is available on the pharmacological profile of metronidazole in birds The aim of our study explain some of its neurological effect in chicks by its interaction with one of organophosphorus insecticide chlorpyrifos that have well-known excitatory effect on nervous system. Median Lethal Doses (LD50) of metronidazole and chlorpyrifos were determined depending on up and down method. The intraperitoneal and oral LD50 of metronidazole were 516.9 mg/kg, 3061.8 mg/kg respectively. The oral LD50of chlorpyrifos was 13.705 mg/kg, intraperitoneal treatment of metronidazole with Oral treatment of chlorpyrifos in ratio 1:1, 1: 0.5, and 0.5:1, respectively of LD50at the same time increased LD50for metronidazole and chlorpyrifos and the isobolographic analysis showed that the points of interaction occurred above the diagonal line connecting between LD50 of each; while oral treatment of metronidazole and chlorpyrifos in ratio 1:0.5 LD50at the same time decreased LD50for metronidazole and chlorpyrifos and the point of interaction was above the diagonal line connecting between LD50 of each in conclusion we found that isobolografhic analysis for metronidazole and chlorpyrifos in different percentages and routs of treatment reveal to antagonist effect despite the similarity in the toxic signs.

The neurobehavioral effects of flumazenil in chicks

Ahmed S. Naser; Yasser M. Albadrany

Iraqi Journal of Veterinary Sciences, 2021, Volume 35, Issue 4, Pages 783-788
DOI: 10.33899/ijvs.2020.128443.1577

Flumazenil is choosy and competitive GABA receptor blocker that serves as an antidote to benzodiazepines overdose. Its administration in humans and some animal’s model is connected with nervousness, anxiety responses, or seizures attacks. The objective of this study was to scrutinize the neurobehavioral reaction as well as sedative and anxiolytic actions of flumazenil in chick’s model. The Median effective dose of flumazenil injected chicks was 0.114 mg/kg i.p. Flumazenil at 0.04 and 0.08 mg/kg diminished the locomotors activity, prolonged the period of tonic immobility and have anxiolytic action in chicks. Flumazenil at 0.1, 0.2 and 0.4 mg/kg cause mild sedation in chicks. Flumazenil at 0.1 and 0.2 mg/kg have antagonistic effects in chicks sedated with diazepam at 10mg/kg. Flumazenil demonstrated fairly unexpectedly a depressant effect in the open field test and sedative and anxiolytic bias attention test in the chick’s model. These findings indicate that the impact of flumazenil is indicative of the characteristics of partial agonists when given on its own and antagonist when given after diazepam according to the neurobehavioral tests.

Analgesic effect of silymarin in chicks

Ahmed Salah Naser; yasser albadrany

Iraqi Journal of Veterinary Sciences, 2019, Volume 33, Issue 2, Pages 273-276
DOI: 10.33899/ijvs.2019.162906

There were no studies about the analgesic effect of silymarin in the chicken. This study examined antinociceptive effect of silymarin given intraperitonially in 7-9 day-old chicks. The median effective dose of silymarin for the induction of analgesia to electric stimulation in the chicks was 65.3 mg/kg. Silymarin at 60, 120 and 240 mg/kg revealed analgesic effect to electric stimulation in chicks in dose dependent manner in comparison with the control group. The analgesic effect of silymarin at 120 and 240 mg/kg started at 15 min after injection and lasted after over 120 min of injection were as silymarin at 60 mg/kg the analgesic effect started at 15 min after injection and declined before 120 min of injection. The peak of analgesic effect for 60, 120 and 240 mg/kg were at 60 min after injection. These results indicate that silymarin have an analgesic property in the chicks model.

Effects of Newcastle disease vaccine on the liver and antioxidant enzymes of chicks

N. G. Mustafa

Iraqi Journal of Veterinary Sciences, 2018, Volume 32, Issue 2, Pages 243-247
DOI: 10.33899/ijvs.2019.153856

Newcastle disease is a highly contagious disease of domestic and wild birds result in huge economic losses due to extreme morbidity and mortality. The aim of this paper is to explore the possibility of the harmful impact of Newcastle disease vaccine on certain biochemical profiles regarded to chicken liver. This study conducted during January-April 2014, one day old - 53 chicks were divided into two groups; vaccinated (with Newcastle disease vaccine) group at the age of 1, 3, and 7 days and unvaccinated group. Results show damaging effects of vaccination on the liver glycogen and malondialdehyde concentrations, serum superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, gamma-glutamyl transferase, alanine transaminase, and aspartate transaminase activities. In contrast, studied parameters look to return to their usual range at the age of 30 days. From the convincing outcome of our investigation, it can be concluded that Newcastle disease vaccination has a detrimental influence on the liver of chickens, nonetheless this effect can be overwhelmed by the time.

The antioxidant activity of propofol in chicks

A.S. Naser; F.K. Mohammad

Iraqi Journal of Veterinary Sciences, 2015, Volume 29, Issue 1, Pages 29-34
DOI: 10.33899/ijvs.2015.116853

The aim of this study was to detect the antioxidant effects of propofol in chicks by estimation of glutathione concentrationin blood plasma, brain and liver as well as total antioxidant capacity and antioxidant effects of propofol in vitro by usinghydrogen peroxide as oxidative stress. Propofol at 20 mg/kg, intraperitoneally significantly increased after 4 hours theconcentration of glutathione concentration in plasma and brain compared with the control group and with 5 and 10mg propofolgroups. Propofol at 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg, i.p significantly increased glutathione concentration in the liver compared with thecontrol group. Propofol at 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg, i.p increased the efflux rate constant by 882, 1031 and 920 %, increasedglutathione turnover rate by 880, 1028, and 917 % and decreased the turnover time by 89, 91 and 90% in the liver. In the brainpropofol at 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg, i.p increased efflux rate constant as 26, 600 and 2826 % and increased glutathione turnoverrate by 29, 616 and 2894 % and a decreased in the turnover time by 21, 86 and 96%. Propofol at 10 and 20 mg/kg, i.psignificantly increased after 20 hours the TAC in the serum of the chick by 38 and 48%, respectively compared with thecontrol group. Propofol at concentrations of 25, 50 and 100 micromoles / liter decreased erythrocyte hemolysis induced byhydrogen peroxide in vitro 10 micromoles / liter in a concentration depended manner by 25, 49 and 64 % respectively. In conclusion, Propofol have antioxidant effect in vivo and in vitro in the chicks. Propofol have a protection against oxidativestress.